Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/eba001/intercultural-calendar.in/class/vtemplate.class.php on line 439

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/eba001/intercultural-calendar.in/class/vtemplate.class.php on line 439

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/eba001/intercultural-calendar.in/class/vtemplate.class.php on line 439
INTERCULTURAL CALENDAR | Themes

Themes

http://intercultural-calendar.in

Interreligious
Understanding

Interreligious Understanding / Presentation

Sikh

Photo by Luis Dafos / Alamy Stock Photo

Sikh

Eating together regardless of class and caste

Sikhs at langar, a communal meal, at the golden temple, Amritsar.

The temple and the mosque are the same, the Hindu worship and the Muslim prayer are the same, all men are the same; it is through erroneous judgment they appear different... All men have the same eyes, the same ears, the same body, the same build, a compound of earth, air, fire and water... let no man, even by mistake, suppose there is a difference.

Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth and the last Guru

Sikhs and Hindus build a mosque

Kakoli Mahanta

Nathowal, a village in Ludhiana, Punjab, finds itself untouched by religious differences. Despite the rising communal tensions over the years, it has not stopped Sikh and Hindu community members of Nathowal from helping Muslims repair an old mosque and even have a second storey constructed. In fact, it is the non-Muslims who are bearing more than 65% of the expenses. Nathowal in Ludhiana has a population of around 7,000 of which around 500 are Muslims and around 50 members are Hindus. The communities lived in peace in the village even before partition. During Partition, ten to twelve Muslim families migrated to Pakistan, but 50 families stayed back as their Sikh brothers didn’t allow them to leave.

Repairing work of the mosque started six months ago. Out of Rs 25 lakh invested in the project, around Rs 15 lakh have been contributed by Sikhs and Hindus. As the work is progressing now, non Muslims are helping by ferrying bricks, cement and sand for the construction. Before this, members of the Muslim and Hindu community had also contributed towards Gurdwara work. The Sikh community takes pride in the village’s communal peace. There may be communal tensions in neighbouring parts of this village, but here things have always remained peaceful. The village celebrate festivals of all communities, including Diwali, Dusshera, Rakhi, Eid, Christmas and Gurupurab.

In order to bring communal harmony, there must be harmony in the minds of the people. The danger of communalism can be averted if the self-defeating and suicidal slogans like ‘my state’, ‘my caste’, ‘my religion’, give way to the noble sentiment of India first and last always. It will integrate our emotions and aspirations and ensure communal harmony and national integration of the country. Only when the internal security is ensured, a nation can embark on the path towards development and economic advancement.

The temple and the mosque are the same, the Hindu worship and the Muslim prayer are the same, all men are the same; it is through erroneous judgment they appear different... All men have the same eyes, the same ears, the same body, the same build, a compound of earth, air, fire and water... let no man, even by mistake, suppose there is a difference.

Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth and the last Guru